Beyond reality: the future of human interface

Virtual Reality, the once thought of next-in-line booming technology appears to be at a standstill. Even with the support of heavy-hitting corporations the technology has yet to explode like many experts predicted it would. It’s still early, but the experiment stage is over with. Billions of dollars have been poured into this industry and if the results continue to be underwhelming it will soon be looked at a quirky trend that never lived up to its potential.

Gaming Industry Plaguing VR

Thanks to sci-fi novels and blockbuster hits the average consumer typically associates VR with the gaming industry. Because of this, tech leaders have invested billions of dollars into the most coveted VR companies like the Oculus Rift, but even with the influence and money behind these major companies the VR gaming industry has yet to experience significant growth.

One obvious reason behind this lack of growth is the limited amount of games offered by these VR companies. None of the world’s highest grossing video games can be played through virtual reality. Users cannot throw a pass in the newest Madden, nor can they shoot down an enemy tanker in the latest Call of Duty. What they can do is play games like Job Simulator, or Farm Harvester.

Eight out of ten homes own a next-gen console. The numbers for how many virtual reality headsets have been sold have yet to be discovered, but it doesn’t reach beyond hundreds of thousands. One serious disadvantage VR gaming has is that it cannot compete with the graphics offered by consoles like the Xbox One or PS4. Players who are used to playing games like FIFA or Halo are used to the selling point of better graphics equals better gameplay. How do you reverse an entire generations thinking? The gaming industry has only itself to blame as they are the ones who developed this ideology in the first place.

Lack of Modernization

For how futuristic it’s supposed to be virtual reality severely lacks the sleek modernized look that should come with a new and exciting advancement of technology. As of now, popular headsets like the HTC Vive are extremely bulky. Users have to place chunky devices over their eyes and use controllers that look eerily similar to the first versions of the Nintendo Wii. There has yet to be a virtual reality device that doesn’t look like giant head-goggles attached to a phone. Oh, don’t forget, if you want to play online with other users you’ll have to connect to a computer and sit right next to your processor.

Not Enough Benefits

When you first put on a virtual reality headset you’ll likely be impressed. It’s exciting, how can’t it be? You just entered a new world! But give it ten, maybe fifteen minutes, and that rush will soon wear off. Not to mention the possible motion-sickness and discomfort that many users have reported of feeling after just 30 minutes of activity.

The fact of the matter is that virtual reality isn’t a new world, and users can easily tell that after a few experiences with any given VR device. Our eyes have been trained to stare at one flat screen, but now we’re being asked to turn 180 degrees within every minute of the game? That’s a hard sell for many consumers. Our days are already long, and most people will choose to get in their exercise the old-fashioned way. When you come from a long day do you want to strap on your 5 pound headset and move around your living room, or do you want to sit down and become a couch potato like the rest of us decent Americans.

As VR Stalls AR Thrives

While virtual reality has yet to reach the average consumer augmented reality is taking over the streets and your pocket cell-phone. You know those silly snapchat filters that you love to use? Or that beloved app known as Pokemon Go? That’s augmented reality, and it’s expected to have over 1 billion users by 2020, with revenue projected to be four times greater than VR. What’s the reason for this? It’s simple: augmented reality is much more user-friendly. Unlike VR, a user does not have to strap on any device over their head or eyes as they can simply use their current smartphone. It’s much more social and can be used in almost any setting, not limiting users to their computers or consoles. Graphics across both platforms are generally the same, but AR has more facial recognition capabilities. AR is not only user-friendly, it’s corporate friendly too. Advertising within virtual reality is dead, but AR advertising is just getting started. From virtual tours in brick and mortar shops to a primary medium for storytelling, AR advertising will soon be submerged within every major city. Don’t worry about finding the cheapest sweatshirt in NYC as it will soon find you through augmented reality!

VR Potential Beyond Gaming

The VR gaming industry is never going to take off like experts thought it would, but that doesn’t mean virtual reality is useless. In fact, where VR makes its biggest impact is far beyond the computer screen and mind of a 16 year old. It’s already being used in hospitals across the country as it acts a key resource to train young surgeons. But it doesn’t stop in the training field, VR can also be used to perform major surgeries: by using VR doctors across the globe can communicate and operate as if they are all standing in the same room, giving patients the ability to have insight and feedback from more than one doctor. It’s also being used to treat soldiers suffering from severe cases of PTSD, and so far, the results are nothing but positive. Virtual reality will soon be widely used across our educational and healthcare sectors, and for good reason as collaboration is almost always a good thing and something that this country could use more of.

Conclusion

Both virtual and augmented reality will continue to receive billions of dollars from investors hoping to become the next Apple or Microsoft. Many of these startups will fail, but the few that succeed will become global influencers. The race is on, whose going to make it to the finish line?